Jeremy Jae Neal and Jordan Morley photo by Megan Shaw
       
     
 Jeremy Jae Neal photo by Megan Shaw
       
     
 Jordan Morley, Penda N'diaye and Connie Shiau photo by Steven Schreiber 
       
     
 Jordan Morley, Jeremy Jae Neal and Penda N'diaye photo by Steven Schreiber
       
     
 Matthew Baker photo by Steven Schreiber
       
     
 photo by Ian Douglas
       
     
       
     
 Jeremy Jae Neal and Jordan Morley photo by Megan Shaw
       
     

Jeremy Jae Neal and Jordan Morley photo by Megan Shaw

 Jeremy Jae Neal photo by Megan Shaw
       
     

Jeremy Jae Neal photo by Megan Shaw

 Jordan Morley, Penda N'diaye and Connie Shiau photo by Steven Schreiber 
       
     

Jordan Morley, Penda N'diaye and Connie Shiau photo by Steven Schreiber 

 Jordan Morley, Jeremy Jae Neal and Penda N'diaye photo by Steven Schreiber
       
     

Jordan Morley, Jeremy Jae Neal and Penda N'diaye photo by Steven Schreiber

 Matthew Baker photo by Steven Schreiber
       
     

Matthew Baker photo by Steven Schreiber

 photo by Ian Douglas
       
     

photo by Ian Douglas

       
     
THE WATERSHED

I began working on The Watershed after a visit to the Hector Pieterson Museum in Soweto, South Africa. While there, I became fixated on the power of perception, and the ways that the 13-year-old Pieterson’s death in an anti-Apartheid protest shines a spotlight on questions of personal choice and collective rights in the struggle for freedom. For Michael Brown, Tyler Clementi, Eric Garner, Islan Nettles, and the countless other faceless and nameless women and men facing violence and discrimination, these questions still have terrible resonance.